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Spring Classic Duathlon & Home Depot
Half Marathon – 5k & 10k
April 19th, 2020
Portland OR

Spring Classic Duathlon & Home Depot
Half Marathon – 5k & 10k
April 19th, 2020
Portland OR

Spring Classic Duathlon & Home Depot
Half Marathon – 5k & 10k
April 19th, 2020
Portland OR

Training Preparation

Ok, Step #1. Register! That puts purpose to your training and forces you to commit – an important part of getting to the finish line! 

Step #2. It’s time to train!  Yes, we want you to get to the finish line feeling strong, healthy, reaching for your best, and injury free!

One way to help your training is to join a local running club, clinic or training studio. Here is a list of resources to assist you with your training and preparation:

Running Clubs

Triathlon Training Clubs:

Personal Training & Coaches

Biking Clubs:

WHAT TO DU (PUN INTENDED!): If this is your first Duathlon, just focus on having fun. Get there early so you can set up your bike and gear in your marked transition spot. Rack your bike, place your helmet and glasses on the handle bar ready to put on. Place a towel on the ground and put your cycling cleats on it (if you wear cycling cleats). Remember, you should only take about 1.5 feet of space in your area. If you take more space than this, you will get some raised eyebrows from the veterans. Just remember that there’s lots of cyclists that have to fit their bikes and gear in a small area so don’t spread out too much. Now take the time to study the transition area. Where do you start, run in, bike in, bike out, run out and finish? Understand the flow. Memorize where your bike is racked. Feel free to ask questions to the Why Racing Event Crew – they are there to help you! Once the race starts, the first run isn’t the one that’s really tough on most duathletes so feel free to go hard or take it easy. When you finish the first run in the transition area, you will run to your bike, put on your helmet and glasses, change shoes if needed and follow instructions from course marshals to direct you around the transition area out the exit. You will be instructed to mount your bike and you’re off exiting safely, single file back to Marine Drive. Once you’re on Marine Drive, bike as hard as you like but take the last mile or so to ride in an easier gear and flush out your legs a bit. That will help your second run a ton! When you arrive back at the transition area, you will be asked to dismount your bike and then run to your transition spot. You will rack your bike, take off your helmet and then change shoes if needed. Then you’re off for your second run. This is the run that is typically more challenging. Yes, your legs will feel heavy and tired. Feel free to go easy and take walk breaks if needed. It usually takes some time but your legs will start feeling better and you can ease into your normal pace. Duathletes prepare for this tough transition by practicing this type of Bike/Run workout appropriately called a ‘Brick Workout’ because your legs feel like bricks when running after cycling. But the more you practice, the easier that transition becomes. So when first starting out, don’t be so hard on yourself if it feels really tough – it gets better! Once your cross the finish line – CELEBRATE! You did it! Wear your medal and finishers’ shirt proudly! WAY TO GO!

For you Runners – General Running Program Design: If you are going to attempt this on your own or would like a better understanding of proper training protocol, here are a few general guidelines for designing your training program.

  1. If you are not running consistently right now, start with a Learn to Run program that will start with 1 minute of running and 4 minutes of walking and gradually progress adding 1 minute of running per session per week and reduce walking until you can comfortably run non-stop.
    As you progress your weekly long runs, do not increase your volume any more than 10-20% every 1-2 weeks. Be more conservative if you are more prone to injury.
  2. Try not to run 2 days in a row if possible. Running exposes your body to a lot of impact and it is helpful to allow your body time to recover in between running workouts, especially if you are prone to injury.
  3. Allow for one full recovery day per week. It doesn’t mean you have to lay around watching TV and eating bon bons all day but it’s a good idea to have one day a week when you aren’t concerned about getting into your training zone and instead, allow your body a day’s rest from impact and intensity.
  4. Invest in a good pair of running shoes and consult with an expert to help determine the right show for your body. Check out the following column where I discuss in detail the key pointers on getting the right running shoe for you. http://blogs.columbian.com/sherri-mcmillan/2014/07/22/choosing-right-athletic-shoes/
  5. If possible, run on packed, level dirt, trails, or grass, which are a lot easier on your body. If running through the city, paved roads (asphalt) are easier on your legs than concrete sidewalks (cement). Just watch for traffic and always run in the opposite direction of cars so you can react if needed.
  6. Implement muscle strength and endurance training into your program. As you run, the muscles of your lower body absorb the forces. As your muscles fatigue, they lose their shock absorbing abilities and the forces are absorbed more through your bones and joints. If you strength train, your muscles become stronger, are better able to absorb impact, take longer to fatigue and are better able to generate greater force leading to faster running speeds. The ability of a muscle to resist fatigue helps reduce the incidence of injury. Research has shown the areas that suffer the largest amount of stress include the feet, the shins, the back, knees and the hip. Therefore, a specific program that addresses these areas must be followed if long-term running is a goal. Luckily you don’t need to spend a great deal of time in the weight room to experience these benefits. All you’ll need to do is 1 set of 8-20 reps of a variety of exercises two times per week. This equates to about 30-60 minutes a few times a week. We’re hoping that those of you who want to minimize your risk for injury and enhance your running performance, will be able to find the motivation and time to fit these short workouts in. If you do not have a personalized weight training program, we strongly encourage you to invest in a few sessions with a trainer, so they can design a program for you. This will ensure you’re not wasting any time during your workouts.
  7. Incorporate cross training into your program. We’d rather see a runner run 3x/week and compliment their program with swimming, cycling, resistance training and fitness classes rather than run 6x/week. Cross training will maintain a greater balance to your program and your body and keep your program exciting.
  8. Consider how you run. Seems easy enough right? Right foot, left foot. But there is actually a science to it. Go to the following link for a blog about Effective Running Technique. http://www.shapeupwithsherri.com/2014/09/29/running-program-week-8/ In fact, there is an 11 week Running Program series chock full of great information for those of you who are starting your running career! 🙂
  9. Before you begin any run or run/walk workout, start with a 6-12 minute walk. This will allow your heart rate and breathing rate to increase gradually, your body temperature to rise and prepare your muscles for the workout. Once you’ve completed your warm-up, complete the following dynamic joint movements to take your lower body joints through their full range of motion in a slow, controlled fashion.
  • Start with one leg in front of the other.
  • Raise the back heel up onto your toes and contract the calf. Repeat 10-15x.
  • Now lift the entire back foot off the floor and contract the glute (buttock). Repeat 10-15x
  • Now lift the back heel towards the buttocks and contract the hamstrings (back of the thigh). Repeat 10-15x.
  • Now lift the knee forwards and contract the quads (front of thigh). Repeat 10-15x.
  • Now hold your knee up and balance while doing 10 ankle circles one way and then the other way.
  • Repeat this sequence on the other leg.
  • Then perform a 20 fast toe taps on each leg and 20 heel raises.
  • You’re now ready to start your workout. Ease into your training zone.
  • Once you have completed each workout including warm-up and cool-down, be sure you save enough time to lengthen and release. This is one of the most important things you can do to reduce your chances of experiencing injuries and to aid in the recovery process. If you don’t foam roll regularly, please a local trainer/coach or call us at 360.574.7292 so we can schedule you in to show you a few critical release techniques.

WHAT TO EAT:

  • Eat well the week before the event. Drink lots of water to ensure you’re well hydrated and stock up on healthy fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein sources. Dinner the two nights before should be a balanced diet of carbs, protein and fat to provide you with sustainable energy. If you know a certain meal has worked in the past, stick with it! And get plenty of rest!
  • On race morning, your pre-race meal should contain easily digestible carbohydrates (ie. Oatmeal, fruit, energy bar) and should be eaten 1-4 hours before the event. Don’t eat anything new. Eat what’s worked in the past. You don’t want any unexpected surprises or digestive upsets.
  • During the event, take water at each of the aid stations. Even just a few sips will help. Gels and energy drink will be available for those participating in the longer events.
  • Post event – Be sure to get some fluids into your system right away. Start with water and energy drink and then transition to Deschutes Brewery – it’s time to celebrate! Definitely consume some of the fruit, soup, rolls, and energy bars that we will provide within 1 hour of finishing the event. This will help you recover much more quickly and replenish those depleted carbs in your muscles. Then later in the day – eat what you want (within reason). You deserve it! 🙂

HAVE FUN! As you travel to the race, repeat some positive self-statements about how good you feel and how excited you are about the event. Smile and get yourself in a good frame of mind. Remember to enjoy the experience. Try your best, but remember to pace yourself! You’ve already won just by showing up!

INSPIRE: One of the best things you can do to help others have an enjoyable experience is to offer lots of support and praise to all your fellow athletes. As you pass someone, tell them how great they’re doing! And as you’re getting passed, tell them how strong they look. Cheer each other on, it makes the time pass by quickly and empowers you and everyone else on the course!

Race Details

Date

04/19/2020
7:45am for Half & 10K

8:00am for 5K

9:00am for Duathlon

Location

The post-event festivities will take place in the parking lot at Home Depot, 11633 NE Glen Widing Drive, Portland, OR.

Packet Pickup Details

Registration package pick up location changes so pay attention to times and days listed below. If you unable to pickup at any of the times listed below, please email us at registration@whyracingevents.com to make other arrangements.

Packet Pickup – SATURDAY APRIL 18th 10am to 6pm

Foot Traffic, 4020 NE Freemont St., Portland, OR 97212

Event Partners

We’re honored to partner with these great companies to provide you the absolute best race experience. We couldn’t do it without them so please show them the LOVE and support them as a thank you for all they do for our community.

CONNECT

Follow @why_racing_events and use #WhyRacing to share photos!

CONTACT

WHY Racing Events Inc.
2310 E 2nd Street, Suite A
Vancouver, WA 98661

Phone: (360) 574-7292
Email: info@whyracingevents.com